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in what order did states ratify the constitution

by Prof. Verla Cassin III Published 11 months ago Updated 3 months ago
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The essays were published in newspapers nationwide. The first state to ratify the Constitution was Delaware on December 7, 1787, followed by Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut.Jun 21, 2022

Which nine states ratified the Constitution?

What were the 9 states that ratified the Constitution?

  • Delaware: December 7, 1787.
  • Pennsylvania: December 12, 1787.
  • New Jersey: December 18, 1787.
  • Georgia: January 2, 1788.
  • Connecticut: January 9, 1788.
  • Massachusetts: February 6, 1788.
  • Maryland: April 28, 1788.
  • South Carolina: May 23, 1788.

Which state secured the ratification of the Constitution?

The Order in Which the States Ratified the US Constitution

  • Need for a New Constitution. In this period, many states realized the need to come together and form a stronger national government.
  • Constitutional Convention. James Madison, often called "the Father of the Constitution," set to work. ...
  • Opposition to Ratification. ...
  • The Federalist Papers. ...
  • Order of Ratification. ...

What was needed In order for Constitution to be ratified?

Ultimately, during the ratification debate in Virginia, Madison conceded that a bill of rights was needed, and the Federalists assured the public that the first step of the new government would be to adopt a bill of rights. It took 10 months for the first nine states to approve the Constitution.

How many states had to approve Constitution?

The Founding Fathers now had to get the states to agree to the document and to vote in favor of it. Nine states needed to vote for the Constitution for it to be accepted. Each state was given six months to meet and vote on the proposed Constitution. On December 7, 1787, Delaware was the first state to vote in favor of, or ratify, it.

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What was the order of states to ratify the Constitution?

The states and the dates of ratification are listed here, in order of ratification:Delaware: December 7, 1787.Pennsylvania: December 12, 1787.New Jersey: December 18, 1787.Georgia: January 2, 1788.Connecticut: January 9, 1788.Massachusetts: February 6, 1788.Maryland: April 28, 1788.South Carolina: May 23, 1788.More items...

What 7 states ratified the Constitution?

MarylandMaryland became the seventh state to ratify, giving a much needed boost to the movement for adoption of the Constitution.

What did 9 of the 13 states have to do in order for the Constitution to be approved?

Instead, on September 28, Congress directed the state legislatures to call ratification conventions in each state. Article VII stipulated that nine states had to ratify the Constitution for it to go into effect. Beyond the legal requirements for ratification, the state conventions fulfilled other purposes.

Which of the 13 states was the first to ratify?

DelawareDelaware was the first State to ratify, on December 7, 1787. After New Hampshire became the ninth State to ratify, on June 22, 1788, the Confederation Congress established March 9, 1789 as the date to begin operating under the Constitution.

What was the order of ratification?

Order of Ratification The Delaware legislature became the first to ratify the Constitution by a vote of 30-0 on December 7, 1787. The ninth state, New Hampshire, ratified it on June 21, 1788, and the new Constitution went into effect on March 4, 1789.

When did all 13 states ratify the Constitution?

The Constitution was not ratified by all states until May 29, 1790, when Rhode Island finally approved the document, and the Bill of Rights was not ratified to become part of the Constitution until the end of the following year.

Who were the first and last states to ratify the Articles of Confederation?

Virginia was the first state to ratify on December 16, 1777, while other states ratified in 1778. When congress reconvened in June of 1778, the delegates learned that Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey refused to ratify the Articles. The Articles required unanimous approval from the states.

What were the last two states to ratify?

On This Day In History: Rhode Island became last of the original 13 Colonies to ratify the U.S. ConstitutionDelaware: December 7, 1787.Pennsylvania: December 12, 1787.New Jersey: December 18, 1787.Georgia: January 2, 1788.Connecticut: January 9, 1788.Massachusetts: February 6, 1788.Maryland: April 28, 1788.More items...•

Which states did not ratify the Constitution?

Rhode Island's role in the drafting and ratification of the US Constitution was unlike other states. Rhode Island was the only state not to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787.

Did all 13 colonies have to ratify the Constitution?

As debates raged in taverns, halls and homes throughout the eastern seaboard in June 1788, only eight of 13 colonies had ratified a future United States Constitution. In order for the Constitution to be officially adopted as the ruling law of the land, it needed to be accepted by at least nine.

What was the 9th state to ratify the Constitution?

New HampshireOn June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify the document, and it was subsequently agreed that government under the U.S. Constitution would begin on March 4, 1789. In June, Virginia ratified the Constitution, followed by New York in July.

Why was it important that all 13 states ratify the Constitution?

Why was it important for all of the states to ratify the Constitution? It is important for all 13 states to ratify the Constitution because if that is done, nobody will be left extremely unhappy. The whole country needs to be willing to work together without too many disagreements.

What states have ratified the Constitution?

The states and the dates of ratification are listed here, in order of ratification: New Hampshire: June 21, 1788 (With this state’s ratification, the Constitution became legal.) Rhode Island: May 29, 1790 (Rhode Island did not hold a Constitutional Convention.)

How many states needed to vote for the Constitution?

Nine states needed to vote for the Constitution for it to be accepted. Each state was given six months to meet and vote on the proposed Constitution. On December 7, 1787, Delaware was the first state to vote in favor of, or ratify, it.

How many delegates signed the Constitution?

On September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was finally accepted by the delegates. It did not contain any sort of Bill of Rights, even though that question had been heavily debated. Of the 42 delegates still present at the convention when it was finished, 39 signed the Constitution. Only Governor Edmund Randolph (Virginia), George Mason (Virginia), and Elbridge Gerry (Massachusetts) declined to sign.

Who declined to sign the Constitution?

Only Governor Edmund Randolph (Virginia), George Mason (Virginia), and Elbridge Gerry (Massachusetts) declined to sign. The Founding Fathers now had to get the states to agree to the document and to vote in favor of it. Nine states needed to vote for the Constitution for it to be accepted.

When did New Hampshire become a state?

New Hampshire became the ninth state to accept the Constitution on June 21, 1788, which officially ended government under the Articles of Confederation. It was not until May 29, 1790, that the last state, Rhode Island, finally ratified the Constitution.

How many states were required to ratify the Constitution?

Article VII, the final article of the Constitution, required that before the Constitution could become law and a new government could form, the document had to be ratified by nine of the thirteen states. Eleven days after the delegates at the Philadelphia convention approved it, copies of the Constitution were sent to each of the states, which were to hold ratifying conventions to either accept or reject it.

Which states voted for the Constitution?

For obvious reasons, smaller, less populous states favored the Constitution and the protection of a strong federal government. Delaware and New Jersey ratified the document within a few months after it was sent to them for approval in 1787. Connecticut ratified it early in 1788. Some of the larger states, such as Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, also voted in favor of the new government. New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify the Constitution in the summer of 1788.

How did the Federalists win the day?

First, the Federalist position tended to win support among businessmen, large farmers, and, in the South, plantation owners. These people tended to live along the Eastern Seaboard. In 1787, most of the states were divided into voting districts in a manner that gave more votes to the eastern part of the state than to the western part. [7] Thus, in some states, like Virginia and South Carolina, small farmers who may have favored the Anti-Federalist position were unable to elect as many delegates to state ratification conventions as those who lived in the east. Small settlements may also have lacked the funds to send delegates to the convention. [8]

What were the objections to the Constitution?

One of the objections raised to the Constitution’s new government was that it did not set term limits for members of Congress or the president. Those who opposed a strong central government argued that this failure could allow a handful of powerful men to gain control of the nation and rule it for as long as they wished. Although the framers did not anticipate the idea of career politicians, those who supported the Constitution argued that reelecting the president and reappointing senators by state legislatures would create a body of experienced men who could better guide the country through crises. A president who did not prove to be a good leader would be voted out of office instead of being reelected. In fact, presidents long followed George Washington’s example and limited themselves to two terms. Only in 1951, after Franklin Roosevelt had been elected four times, was the Twenty-Second Amendment passed to restrict the presidency to two terms.

What did Madison argue about the Federalist?

Objections that an elite group of wealthy and educated bankers, businessmen, and large landowners would come to dominate the nation’s politics were also addressed by Madison in Federalist No. 10. Americans need not fear the power of factions or special interests, he argued, for the republic was too big and the interests of its people too diverse to allow the development of large, powerful political parties. Likewise, elected representatives, who were expected to “possess the most attractive merit,” would protect the government from being controlled by “an unjust and interested [biased in favor of their own interests] majority.”

What states were outside the Union?

Two were the wealthy, populous states of Virginia and New York. In Virginia, James Madison’s active support and the intercession of George Washington, who wrote letters to the convention, changed the minds of many. Some who had initially opposed the Constitution, such as Edmund Randolph, were persuaded that the creation of a strong union was necessary for the country’s survival and changed their position. Other Virginia delegates were swayed by the promise that a bill of rights similar to the Virginia Declaration of Rights would be added after the Constitution was ratified. On June 25, 1788, Virginia became the tenth state to grant its approval.

What was the sticking point of the Constitution?

The greatest sticking point when it came to ratification, as it had been at the Constitutional Convention itself, was the relative power of the state and federal governments. The framers of the Constitution believed that without the ability to maintain and command an army and navy, impose taxes, and force the states to comply with laws passed by Congress, the young nation would not survive for very long. But many people resisted increasing the powers of the national government at the expense of the states. Virginia’s Patrick Henry, for example, feared that the newly created office of president would place excessive power in the hands of one man. He also disapproved of the federal government’s new ability to tax its citizens. This right, Henry believed, should remain with the states.

The Process for Ratifying the Constitution

While we are all aware of what the United States Constitution is and its overall impact on the country as a whole, considerably fewer people are aware that it was not our first system of government.

What Order Did the States Officially Ratify the Constitution?

Because of the many legitimate concerns brought about by the Anti-Federalists, the Federalists and proponents of the Constitution’s ratification agreed to add in a bill of rights. Founding father James Madison introduced twelve amendments in 1789, ten of which were ratified, thus creating the Bill of Rights.

The Importance of the Bill Of Rights for the Constitution

While it ultimately worked out in the Federalists’ favor, it cannot be overstated just how vitally important it was that the Bill of Rights was included in the Constitution.

Which states ratified the ERA?

New Hampshire and Delaware ratified the ERA on March 23. Iowa and Idaho ratified on March 24. Kansas, Nebraska, and Texas ratified by the end of March. Seven more states ratified in April. Three ratified in May, and two in June.

How many states ratified the Equal Rights Amendment?

Thirty-five states ratified the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Five of those states later rescinded their ERA ratifications for various reasons, however, at present, the prior ratifications are still being counted in the final total. The five states that rescinded their ERA ratifications were:

How many states ratified the ERA in 1972?

1972: In the first year, 22 states ratified the ERA. (Stares are listed alphabetically, not in sequence of ratification within the year.)

What is the three state strategy for ratifying the ERA?

While ratification of an amendment via Article V is standard, a coalition of strategists and supporters have been working to ratify the ERA using something called "a three-state strategy," which would allow the legislation to go the states without the constraints of a time limit —in the tradition of the 19th Amendment.

How many rescissions are there?

There is some question regarding the legitimacy of the five rescissions, for several reasons. Among the legal questions:

When did Indiana ratify the ERA?

Indiana became the 35 th state to ratify the amendment on January 18, 1977. Unfortunately, the ERA fell three states short of the necessary 38 states to become adopted as part of the Constitution.

What is the equality of rights amendment?

The "Equality of Rights Amendment" has similar wording to the proposed federal ERA of the 1970s. “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”.

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Need For A New Constitution

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In this period, many states realized the need to come together and form a stronger national government. Some states met to try and deal with their individual trade and economic issues. However, they soon realized that individual agreements would not be enough for the scale of problems that were arising. On May 25, 178…
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Constitutional Convention

  • James Madison, often called "the Father of the Constitution," set to work. The framers sought to create a document that would be flexible enough to ensure that states retained their rights, but that would also create a national government strong enough to keep order among the states and meet threats from within and without. The 55 framers of the Constitution met in secret to debat…
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Opposition to Ratification

  • Ratification did not come easily nor without opposition. Led by Patrick Henry of Virginia, a group of influential colonial Patriots known as the Anti-Federalistspublicly opposed the new Constitution in town hall meetings, newspapers, and pamphlets. Some argued that the delegates at the Constitutional Convention had overstepped their congressional authority by proposing to replac…
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The Federalist Papers

  • Favoring ratification, the Federalists responded, arguing that rejection of the Constitution would lead to anarchy and social disorder. Using the pen name Publius, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay countered Clinton’s Anti-Federalist Papers. Beginning in October 1787, the trio published 85 essays for New York newspapers. Collectively titled The Federalist Papers, the …
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